Photo by James Harrison on Unsplash

Continuing my series, I now focus on interacting with the Flickr.com API to retrieve a photostream and decode the result into individual Flickr photos for consumption in my iOS app. In this article, I describe the use of the Flickr API, JSON modeling, and OAuth authentication.

Flickr API Background

Flickr’s Application Programming Interface (API) is the official means for programmers to interact with Flickr.com. It provides the programmer with a standardized, fully supported set of methods that return data from Flickr.com in a documented, standard format.

The Flickr API uses an Endpoint URL for each method combined with security keys the programmer requests…

Photo by Tirza van Dijk on Unsplash

Introduction

First, let me say I love SwiftUI! Why am I such a fan of SwiftUI? I prefer the declarative approach to interface development over the imperative (Interface Builder) approach. SwiftUI allows me to more rapidly iterate on design ideas and see the results even without running the iOS Simulator. With my fanboy declaration out of the way, let’s dive into my SwiftUI development process.

NOTE: This is not a SwiftUI tutorial or even a detailed introduction to SwiftUI. There are many useful resources for such information on developer.apple.com and raywenderlich.com. …

Photo by Scott Graham on Unsplash

In Part 1 of the series, I outlined my overall approach to iOS development. Here’s the outline of the significant steps as a reminder:

  1. Develop user personas and associated user stories
  2. Detail the Desired App Features and Requirements
  3. Determine Best App Architecture
  4. Determine the minimal viable product (MVP) for the initial app release
  5. UX design (SwiftUI)
  6. Data Modeling (JSON)
  7. Coding and Testing
  8. Preparing for iOS App Store Submission
  9. Develop plans for a future version to implement features that didn’t make the initial MVP for release

In my next couple of articles, I will focus on the fifth bullet by offering…

Photo by Fotis Fotopoulos on Unsplash

In Part 1 of the series, I outlined my overall approach to iOS development. Here’s the outline of the significant steps as a reminder:

  1. Develop user personas and associated user stories
  2. Detail the Desired App Features and Requirements
  3. Determine Best App Architecture
  4. Determine the minimal viable product (MVP) for the initial app release
  5. UX design (SwiftUI)
  6. Data Modeling (JSON)
  7. Coding and Testing
  8. Preparing for iOS App Store Submission
  9. Develop plans for a future version to implement features that didn’t make the initial MVP for release

In this article, I will focus on the third and fourth bullets to offer insights…

Photo by Abdelrahman Sobhy on Unsplash

Recently, I decided to go “all in” on the latest iOS14 frameworks, including SwiftUI (Apple’s declarative interface design) and Combine (Apple’s version of reactive programming). In this series of articles, I will take you through my development process from idea to readying the completed app for submission to the iOS App Store.

I chose to build an app for curating photos. Why? Because one of my hobbies is photography. While I enjoy taking pictures, I also appreciate photos taken by others and use them as inspiration for my images and honing my skills. I’ve been a longtime Flickr.com user, so…

In Part1, I focused on the big picture of the design and how to “see” the various iOS UIKit elements hiding within the design. In this article, I focus on the UITableViewCell and its content. As a reminder, here’s the design we’re studying:

Concept Design from Pinterest

TableViews

Concept Design from Pinterest

One of the most daunting aspects of iOS app development is trying to understand which UIKit elements to use when implementing a design concept. In this article, I describe the process I use to make implementation decisions based on a concept design from a recent project.

The choices made by the designer usually have a direct impact on the complexity of the Swift code for your iOS app. You certainly don’t want to create even more complex code by choosing less optimal UIKit elements to implement the intended design. One of the best skills you can develop as an iOS…

In my opinion, one of the most exciting aspects of iOS development is the ability to subclass and customize Apple’s UIKit classes, such as UIButton and UIImageView. A developer can create subclasses to fit the “flavor and feel” of the app they envision. However, the only way to see those wonderful customized subclasses is by running the app in the Simulator or on a hardware device, making UI design/refinement quite painful. Or, so I thought. In reality, it is rather simple to see your custom UIKit subclasses in the Xcode Interface Builder. Are you interested? If so, keep reading.

Just…

Yes, I know I’m late coming to the world of iOS development at my age, but I am finding a lot of joy in the journey I’m beginning at 50+. But, I have to admit, I feel very much like a minority in this new endeavor, which begs a couple of questions I’ll try to answer in this article.

Why am I learning to be an iOS developer?

I am a lifelong learner. I believe in keeping my mind active and trying new things. And I’ve always loved technology. Growing up as personal computers came into being was an exciting time. My first experience was on an Apple ][+

Jody Abney

I’m an iOS developer with extensive professional experience in Pharma IT, SAP implementation, Data Migration, Data Analytics/Data Science, and Machine Learning

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